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Showing 1 - 10 of 957 Results
  • Dedication of the First Synagogue of the Jewish Consumptives' Relief Societ

    URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10176/codu:64386

    Summary: Dedication of the first synagogue of the Jewish Consumptives' Relief Society (JCRS), in 1907. There is a large crowd gathered around the synagogue, which was a tent erected with the help of donor Bath-Seva Fleishman. The JCRS was a sanatorium for tuberculosis patients that was founded in 1904 by a group of immigrant Jewish workingmen along with the support of several leading physicians and rabbis in Denver, Colorado. The sanatorium was located on West Colfax Avenue just outside of Denver.

  • First Synagogue of the Jewish Consumptives' Relief Society

    URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10176/codu:64385

    Summary: Exterior view of the first synagogue of the Jewish Consumptives' Relief Society (JCRS). This tent, donated by Mrs. Bath-Sheba Fleishman of Omaha, Neb., was erected in 1906. Signage on the roof and next to the door is in Hebrew. The JCRS was a sanatorium for tuberculosis patients that was founded in 1904 by a group of immigrant Jewish workingmen along with the support of several leading physicians and rabbis in Denver, Colorado. The sanatorium was located on West Colfax Avenue just outside of Denver.

  • Jewish Consumptives' Relief Society's Merry Makers

    URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10176/codu:64408

    Summary: Patients perform in the Jewish Consumptives' Relief Society's (JCRS) Merry Makers production of 'Whoopie.' The JCRS was a sanatorium for tuberculosis patients that was founded in 1904 by a group of immigrant Jewish workingmen along with the support of several leading physicians and rabbis in Denver, Colorado. The sanatorium was located on West Colfax Avenue just outside of Denver.

  • Jewish Consumptives' Relief Society's Minstrel Show

    URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10176/codu:64407

    Summary: Patients perform in the Jewish Consumptives' Relief Society's (JCRS) Minstrel Show in 1928. Several of the performers wear blackface, a style of theatrical makeup that was popular at the time. The JCRS was a sanatorium for tuberculosis patients that was founded in 1904 by a group of immigrant Jewish workingmen along with the support of several leading physicians and rabbis in Denver, Colorado. The sanatorium was located on West Colfax Avenue just outside of Denver.

  • National Jewish Hospital's Board of Trustees

    URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10176/codu:64390

    Summary: Portrait of National Jewish Hospital's Board of Trustees stands on steps of an unidentified building, which was probably located on the hospital's campus. First row left to right: M. D. Barnett, Rabbi William Friedman, two unidentified men, and Dr. Robert Levy. Second row left to right: Sam Cohen, Ernest Morris, Sam Grimes, Sam Fleisher, and Arthur Friedman. Row 3 left to right: Michael Baum, three unidentified men, and Morris Cohen. Row 4 left to right: Dr. Adelman, an unidentified man, and David Harlem.

  • Patient in Bed at the Jewish Consumptives' Relief Society

    URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10176/codu:64406

    Summary: A row of beds at the Jewish Consumptives' Relief Society (JCRS). An unidentified male patient reading a book is in the farthest bed. The JCRS was a sanatorium for tuberculosis patients that was founded in 1904 by a group of immigrant Jewish workingmen along with the support of several leading physicians and rabbis in Denver, Colorado. The sanatorium was located on West Colfax Avenue just outside of Denver.

  • Portrait of Dr. Charles Spivak

    URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10176/codu:64389

    Summary: Formal head and shoulders portrait of Denver physician Dr. Charles Spivak, who served as executive secretary of the Jewish Consumptives Relief Society from 1904 until his death in 1927.

  • Tent on Grounds of the Jewish Consumptives' Relief Society

    URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10176/codu:64405

    Summary: This medical services tent at the Jewish Consumptives' Relief Society (JCRS) Sanatorium near Edgewater, just west of Denver, Colo., was dedicated March 26, 1905. A sign on the door reads: ''Laboratory and Dispensary.'' The sign over the door reads: ''Minsker Independent Benevolent Ass'n. New York City.'' The sign to the right of the door reads: 'This tent erected and furnished by the Minsker Independent Benevolent Association of New York.'' Early patients and staff were housed in Tucker Tents, which were shelters that helped contain the highly contagious tuberculosis while allowing air to pass through at all times. A boardwalk in the foreground (with doormat) connects this tent to others in the complex. The JCRS was a sanatorium for tuberculosis patients that was founded in 1904 by a group of immigrant Jewish workingmen along with the support of several leading physicians and rabbis in Denver, Colorado. It was located on West Colfax Avenue just outside of Denver.

  • Biochemical Laboratory at the Jewish Consumptives' Relief Society

    URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10176/codu:64417

    Summary: Interior of the Biochemical Laboratory, in the I. Rude Building, on the campus of the Jewish Consumptives' Relief Society (JCRS). Three staff members work at lab benches; at left, a man draws blood from a seated woman's arm. The JCRS was a sanatorium for tuberculosis patients that was founded in 1904 by a group of immigrant Jewish workingmen along with the support of several leading physicians and rabbis in Denver, Colorado. The sanatorium was located on West Colfax Avenue just outside of Denver.

  • Biochemical Laboratory at the Jewish Consumptives' Relief Society

    URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10176/codu:64419

    Summary: Interior of the Biochemical Laboratory in the I. Rude Building, on the campus of the Jewish Consumptives' Relief Society (JCRS). The JCRS was a sanatorium for tuberculosis patients that was founded in 1904 by a group of immigrant Jewish workingmen along with the support of several leading physicians and rabbis in Denver, Colorado. The sanatorium was located on West Colfax Avenue just outside of Denver.