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Showing 1 - 10 of 957 Results
  • The War Years: Berlin, between 1940-1945

    Record ID: B333.02.0001.0002

    Component Level: File

    Abstract: Documents related to the Loewenstein's life in Berlin during World War II. File includes a letter to Dr. Max Loewenstein from the Reich Association of Jews in Germany, letter from the Wittenauer Sanatorium admitting Max Loewenstein, visitors pass for Marie Loewenstein to Wittenauer Sanatorium, eviction notices for Max and Marie Lowenstein from the Jewish Cultural Association of Berlin, letter to Marie Loewenstein postponing the eviction order, letter from Wittenauer Sanatorium discharging Max Loewenstein, Max Loewenstein's registration with the police, receipts used by Marie Loewenstein to verify residence in a Jewish home, two copies of Marie Loewenstein's birth and baptism certificate, two copies of Max and Marie Loewenstein's marriage certificate, Marie's parent's marriage certificate, an anonymous poem shared by Berlin Jews, Marie Loewenstein's working papers, two household ID booklets, and four ration books belonging to Karin Steinberg and Marie Loewenstein.

  • Letter of Admittance to Wittenauer Sanatorium, 9/25/1941

    Record ID: B333.02.0001.0002.00002

    Component Level: Item

    Creator: Wittenauer Heilstätten

    Abstract: Letter admitting Dr. Max Loewenstein into Wittenauer Heilstätten, Wittenauer Sanatorium, written on Wittenauer Sanatorium letterhead, addressed to Marie Loewenstein. This letter also promises transfer of the family's ration cards to her. Ration cards listed are for food, an ID card, household goods, and clothing. Shortly after Max Loewenstein was admitted, the Nazis began a major roundup of Berlin's Jews to send them to the Eastern European ghettos and concentration camps.

  • Visitors Pass to Wittenauer Sanatorium, 9/29/1941

    Record ID: B333.02.0001.0002.00003

    Component Level: Item

    Creator: Wittenauer Heilstätten

    Abstract: Visitors pass to admit Marie Loewenstein to Wittenauer Heilstätten, Wittenauer Sanatorium, to visit Dr. Max Loewenstein. Front side is an official printed and typed pass signed by the public prosecutor and including the contact information for the Wittenauer Sanatorium. The back is a list of rules for visitors to the Wittenauer Sanatorium.

  • Discharge from Wittenauer Sanatorium, 4/11/1942

    Record ID: B333.02.0001.0002.00012

    Component Level: Item

    Creator: Wittenauer Heilstätten

    Abstract: Letter that served as official discharge papers sent to Marie Loewenstein [Löwenstein in this document] for Dr. Max Loewenstein to leave Wittenauer Heilstätten, Wittenauer Sanatorium. Letter is on official Wittenauer Sanatorium stationary. Max was to be released on April 12, 1942.

  • Dedication of the First Synagogue of the Jewish Consumptives' Relief Societ

    URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10176/codu:64386

    Summary: Dedication of the first synagogue of the Jewish Consumptives' Relief Society (JCRS), in 1907. There is a large crowd gathered around the synagogue, which was a tent erected with the help of donor Bath-Seva Fleishman. The JCRS was a sanatorium for tuberculosis patients that was founded in 1904 by a group of immigrant Jewish workingmen along with the support of several leading physicians and rabbis in Denver, Colorado. The sanatorium was located on West Colfax Avenue just outside of Denver.

  • First Synagogue of the Jewish Consumptives' Relief Society

    URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10176/codu:64385

    Summary: Exterior view of the first synagogue of the Jewish Consumptives' Relief Society (JCRS). This tent, donated by Mrs. Bath-Sheba Fleishman of Omaha, Neb., was erected in 1906. Signage on the roof and next to the door is in Hebrew. The JCRS was a sanatorium for tuberculosis patients that was founded in 1904 by a group of immigrant Jewish workingmen along with the support of several leading physicians and rabbis in Denver, Colorado. The sanatorium was located on West Colfax Avenue just outside of Denver.

  • Jewish Consumptives' Relief Society's Merry Makers

    URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10176/codu:64408

    Summary: Patients perform in the Jewish Consumptives' Relief Society's (JCRS) Merry Makers production of 'Whoopie.' The JCRS was a sanatorium for tuberculosis patients that was founded in 1904 by a group of immigrant Jewish workingmen along with the support of several leading physicians and rabbis in Denver, Colorado. The sanatorium was located on West Colfax Avenue just outside of Denver.

  • Jewish Consumptives' Relief Society's Minstrel Show

    URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10176/codu:64407

    Summary: Patients perform in the Jewish Consumptives' Relief Society's (JCRS) Minstrel Show in 1928. Several of the performers wear blackface, a style of theatrical makeup that was popular at the time. The JCRS was a sanatorium for tuberculosis patients that was founded in 1904 by a group of immigrant Jewish workingmen along with the support of several leading physicians and rabbis in Denver, Colorado. The sanatorium was located on West Colfax Avenue just outside of Denver.

  • National Jewish Hospital's Board of Trustees

    URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10176/codu:64390

    Summary: Portrait of National Jewish Hospital's Board of Trustees stands on steps of an unidentified building, which was probably located on the hospital's campus. First row left to right: M. D. Barnett, Rabbi William Friedman, two unidentified men, and Dr. Robert Levy. Second row left to right: Sam Cohen, Ernest Morris, Sam Grimes, Sam Fleisher, and Arthur Friedman. Row 3 left to right: Michael Baum, three unidentified men, and Morris Cohen. Row 4 left to right: Dr. Adelman, an unidentified man, and David Harlem.

  • Patient in Bed at the Jewish Consumptives' Relief Society

    URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10176/codu:64406

    Summary: A row of beds at the Jewish Consumptives' Relief Society (JCRS). An unidentified male patient reading a book is in the farthest bed. The JCRS was a sanatorium for tuberculosis patients that was founded in 1904 by a group of immigrant Jewish workingmen along with the support of several leading physicians and rabbis in Denver, Colorado. The sanatorium was located on West Colfax Avenue just outside of Denver.