Showing 1 - 4 of 4 Results
  • Collection on Guldman Family and Golden Eagle Dry Goods

    ID: B294

    Abstract: Leopold H. Guldman was born in Harburg, Bavaria in 1853 and immigrated to the United States in 1870. He was one of Colorado's leading merchants and philanthropists. Guldman came to the Colorado mountains in search of silver, but found it more profitable to open the Golden Eagle clothing stores in Leadville and Cripple Creek. In 1879, Guldman moved to Denver and opened his third and most successful Golden Eagle enterprise, which for many years was Denver's leading popular-price department store. By 1901, its five-story building occupied most of the block at 16th and Lawrence Streets. Guldman's philanthropy contributed to the growth of National Jewish Hospital (NJH), the Jewish Consumptives' Relief Society (JCRS), Beth Israel Hospital, Temple Emanuel, and the Guldman Community Center, which evolved into today's Denver Jewish Community Center. After Guldman's death in 1936, his store endured hard times and was forced to close in 1941.

  • Fashion Bar and Levy Family Papers

    ID: B097

    Creator: Fashion Bar (Denver, Colo.)

    Abstract: The Fashion Bar began as a hosiery shop established by Jack Levy in 1933 and managed by his sister Hannah Levy. Born in Haigerloch, Germany, both Hannah, Jack with their brother Edward, emigrated to America in the 1920s. Jack started as a traveling salesman and Hannah as a shop girl in Denver, Colorado working for Neusteter's Department Store, before opening their own store which evolved into the Fashion Bar Corporation. Despite the Great Depression, the enterprise flourished and within three years it grew to five clothing stores that were later named Fashion Bar. In 1940, Jack and Hannah Levy bought out their partner and took full control of the business. They brought William Weil on board as manager and later he became president of the company. Records of the Fashion Bar include scrapbooks, photographs, newspaper clippings, drawings, financial records, memorabilia and correspondence.

  • Luby Family and Luby Chevrolet Records

    ID: B365

    Creator: Luby Chevrolet Co

    Abstract: Luby Chevrolet, one of Colorado's oldest car dealerships, was started in 1920 in Denver, Colorado by Sam Luby, later joined by brothers Louis and Henry Luby. Joe Luby, who had worked at Luby Chevrolet from the bottom up, bought out his brothers in 1956. "Papa Joe" moved the dealership to Colorado in 1972. Joe Luby's daughter JoAnn and her husband Richard Fleischman purchased the Luby Chevrolet dealership in 1992. They sold the business in 1998, but Richard Fleischman stayed on as president until 2004.

  • Milton M. Schayer Papers

    ID: M067

    Creator: Schayer, Milton M. (Milton Mincha), 1876-1935

    Abstract: Milton Mincha Schayer (1876-1935) was a Denver, Colorado businessman. Born to German-Jewish parents, he was active in many civic and religious organizations in Denver in the early part of the twentieth century. He wrote a weekly syndicated column titled, "Things to think about," which appeared in a variety of Jewish newspapers around the country.

    In 1927, Schayer wrote to a number of Nobel Prize-winning scientists, literary figures, university presidents and judges inquiring about their views on religion and science. He expressed a concern that college students of the day were “drifting away from all religious impulses,” and that this notion was based on “a seeming conflict between the discoveries of scientists and the claims of religionists.” Given the in-depth scientific studies and life experience of these figures, he wished to know their ideas on the subject, for possible publication. Most of the correspondents either did not want their views published, or referred Schayer to writings on the matter that were already published.