Showing 1 - 10 of 11 Results
  • Allied Jewish Community Council of Denver Records

    ID: B102

    Abstract: The Allied Jewish Community Council of Denver was established in 1949 with goals to unite the Jewish community of Denver and work to coordinate charitable activities and the advancement of the Jewish community in Denver. Collection contains administrative papers, surveys, pamphlets and brochures relating to the Allied Jewish Community Council of Denver.

  • Anna Ginsberg Hayutin Textiles and Other Material

    ID: B107

    Creator: Hayutin, Anna Ginsberg, 1893-1973

    Abstract: Anna Ginsberg was born in 1893 to East European Jewish immigrants who had settled in New York City. She completed high school in New York and moved to Denver, Colo., in 1910. In 1912 she married Morris Hayutin, and they had three children: Peryle, Irving, and Arthur. The collection contains household and personal items from the early to mid-20th century that belonged to Anna Hayutin. Most of the textiles in the collection were created by Anna Hayutin herself and include a large number of table linens, bed linens, and doilies. The collection also features women's personal accessories and her high school graduation autograph album.

  • Beth David Sisterhood Articles of Incorporation

    ID: B280

    Creator: Colorado. Department of State

    Abstract: In 1926, Beth David Sisterhood was founded in an effort to create a new Hebrew school and Jewish social center for the West Colfax area of Denver, Colorado. The Beth David Hebrew School and Center met at the home of the Reverend and Mrs. Jacob Gordon at 1490 Julian Street. In November 1928, Beth David Sisterhood formed an alliance with Beth David Brotherhood and the Denver Hebrew Institute, and this group became known as the Hebrew Educational Alliance in 1929. The collection consists of the State of Colorado Articles of Incorporation (June 12, 1930) certificate for Beth David Sisterhood.

  • Collection on Seraphine Pisko

    ID: B242

    Creator: National Jewish Hospital for Consumptives (U.S.)

    Abstract: Seraphine Eppstein Pisko was Executive-Secretary of National Jewish Hospital from 1911 to 1938. She was involved in both Jewish and secular social organizations, holding executive positions in the Hebrew Ladies' Benevolent Society, National Council of Jewish Women, and National Jewish Hospital. The collection, intentionally assembled by the Beck Archives, consists of papers providing biographical information about Pisko as well as letterhead and invitations from National Jewish Hospital and National Council of Women, Inc.

  • Colorado Committee of Concern for Soviet Jewry Records

    ID: B093

    Creator: Freidman, Rhoda

    Creator: Hoffman, Lillian, 1913-1996

    Abstract: Soviet Jews who wanted to emigrate from the Soviet Union were known as "refuseniks." American Jewish students formed the Student Struggle for Soviet Jewry (SSSJ) in 1964 and the American Jewish Committee on Soviet Jewry (AJCSI) was also organized that year. Rabbi Samuel Adelman, rabbi of the BMH synagogue, spoke at Temple Emanuel and urged the liberal congregation to help Soviet Jews. Rabbi Raymond Zwerin, Sheldon Steinhauser, and Lillian Hoffman formed what became the Colorado Committee of Concern for Soviet Jewry (CCCSJ). The three founders were later joined Rhoda Friedman. Lillian Hoffman was the leading force behind CCCSJ and encouraged the organization to stage public demonstrations. The CCCSJ was the first Jewish group in Denver to have public protests, which ranged from ten to 250 demonstrations. Many in the Denver Jewish establishment did not support public protests and the CCCSJ severed its ties to the ADL in 1976. Internal conflict marred the creation of the Babi Yar Park in Denver by the CCCSJ. In 1970 Rabbi Zwerin resigned from the CCCSJ and Lillian Hoffman resigned from the Babi Yar Park Foundation Committee. The goals of CCCSJ included public education as to the plight of the Soviet Jews, to support Soviet refuseniks in their efforts to emigrate, to help Soviet Jews retain their Jewish heritage, and to organize and promote the CCCSJ goals. The major activities of the CCCSJ included the Adopt-a-Family program and projects for the Soviet Jewish political prisoners known as Prisoners of Conscience (POC). The CCCSJ also educated public officials and U.S. Senator Henry Jackson took up the cause and had impact in a bill to grant special trade status to Russia.

  • Congregation Micah Records

    ID: B136

    Creator: Congregation Micah (Denver, Colo.)

    Abstract: Congregation Micah, the second Jewish Reform congregation in Denver, was started by members of Denver's Temple Emanuel who felt that their congregation had strayed from the principles taught by its former leader, Rabbi William Friedman. A number of individuals involved in the school's formation started a Reform Judaism congregation, which became incorporated in September 1956 as the Denver Congregation for Reform Judaism and changed its name to Congregation Micah in 1957. Congregation Micah is still active, currently meeting at 2600 Leyden in Denver.

  • Jewish Consumptives' Relief Society Records

    ID: B002

    Creator: Jewish Consumptives' Relief Society (U.S.)

    Abstract: The Jewish Consumptives' Relief Society was known as the JCRS and was founded in Denver, Colorado in 1904 as a non-sectarian sanatorium to treat tuberculosis (TB) patients, free of charge, in all stages of the disease. The society was one of the leading tuberculosis sanatoria in the country at the turn of the century founded by a group of immigrant Eastern European Jewish men, many of whom were themselves victims of TB. Headed by Dr. Charles Spivak as Secretary (1904-1927) and by Dr. Philip Hillkowitz as President (1904-1948), the sanatorium treated primarily Jewish patients (notably, Solomon Bloomgarden who served as publicity chairman). In 1954 institution changed its mission to cancer research and became American Medical Center; in 1970s renamed AMC Cancer Research Center and Hospital. Today known as AMC Cancer Research Center.

    Records highlight immigration history, medical history (particularly tuberculosis treatment), social and women's history, as well as the growth and development of Colorado's Jewish community. The collection includes correspondence, patient records, legal & financial records, scrapbooks, visitor registers, periodicals, minutes, committee reports, newspaper clippings, sound discs, and photographs.

  • National Jewish Hospital Records

    ID: B005

    Creator: National Jewish Medical and Research Center (U.S.)

    Abstract: In 1899, the Jewish community erected National Jewish Hospital (NJH), the first sanatorium in Denver, Colorado for tuberculosis victims. With the financial assistance of the International Order of B'nai B'rith, the hospital served Jews and gentiles alike and accepted indigent patients free of charge. The NJH adopted a program that emphasized the benefits of fresh air, good nutrition, and rest. Some of the physicians associated with the hospital included Dr. Saling Simon, Dr. Robert Levy, and Dr. John Elsner. The collection includes correspondence, limited patient records, minutes, financial statements, reports, scrapbooks, and objects from 1899 to 2007.

    Non-sectarian sanatorium for treatment of tuberculosis opened in 1899 in Denver, Colo. Patients from all over the U.S. were admitted free of charge. With the assistance of the national B'nai B'rith fraternal organization, the hospital was founded by group of Jewish residents of Denver who were of German descent. Early founders included Frances Wisebart Jacobs and Rabbi William Friedman of Denver's Congregation Emmanual. Samuel Grabfelder served as president from 1899-1920; Seraphine Pisko was executive secretary from 1911-1938. In 1997 the organization changed its name to National Jewish Medical and Research Center and focused on lung, allergic and immune diseases. Meeting minutes, annual reports, correspondence, limited patient records, financial records, scrapbooks, photographs and sound discs cover tuberculosis treatment, medical history, immigration and acculturation, Colorado's Jewish community and women's history.

  • Rocky Mountain Jewish Historical Society Oral Histories

    ID: B098

    Creator: Rocky Mountain Jewish Historical Society

    Abstract: In 1976 the Rocky Mountain Jewish Historical Society (RMJHS) began conducting interviews of Denver's long-time Jewish community members in an effort to record oral histories reflecting Jewish history and culture in Colorado. The interviews were made by the former and current directors of RMJHS as well as its trained volunteers. These recordings of Jewish men and women reveal information about the history of various individuals and families, Jewish organizations, religious groups, medical and social centers, schools, and businesses in Colorado. The oral histories provide insights into the experiences of European-Jewish immigrants and Jewish settlers in Colorado during the 19th and early 20th centuries; the recordings also recount the daily activities that defined Jewish social and professional lives in Colorado.

  • Rosen And Sladek Family Papers

    ID: B292

    Creator: Sladek, Daniel, 1965-

    Creator: Sladek, Osi

    Creator: Sladek, Ron D.

    Abstract: Russian Jewish immigrants Samuel Castille and Zelda Goldberg Rosen settled on Denver's west side and raised 13 children. Their daughter Clara Rosen married Joseph Rosen and they had four children including Selma Rosen who married Osi Sladek. Joseph Rosen began selling newspapers in Denver at the age of seven, starting out as a helper for his future brothers-in-law Max and Al Rosen. Hyman Rosen was born in Denver in 1916, the third youngest of the 13 children of Samuel and Zelda Rosen. He began selling newspapers for the Denver Post in 1922 and sold papers for eight years. His brothers Max and Osi Sladek began entertaining people when he was a child growing up in Hungary after his family escaped the Holocaust. The family moved to Israel and at the age of 18 he became the youngest published song writer in Israel. He was part of the folk revival in California, where he met his future wife Selma Rosen. Osi and Selma settled in Denver and raised four children, including Daniel and Ron. The articles, correspondence, and compact discs reflect the history of four generations of the Rosen and Sladek families.