Showing 1 - 10 of 165 Results
  • Brief report. Berlin

    Summary: Congressman Peter H. Dominick (R-Colo.) delivers several installments of his radio address, a Brief report, from Berlin, Germany. Rep. Dominick discusses the recent call-up of reservists to combat communist aggression, his tour of American military bases in Europe and how they prevent the spread of communist control, and his views on freedom versus communism. He also talks about a number of other topics including the day-to-day lives of Germans living in East Berlin versus those living in West Berlin, Soviet influence in East Germany, the Berlin Wall and how it separates German families and friends, and fallout shelters in West and East Berlin. Dominick interviews his nephew, Gare Dominick, who is a member of the military stationed in Germany. Gare answers questions about the lives of the East Germans, the possibility of a revolt against the East German government and entry points between East and West Berlin. Rep. Dominick also gives tape editing directions to an individual named Walt[er Morgan?], discusses concerns about the release of his nephew's comments on U.S. foreign policy while he is on military duty, and talks about changes to his itinerary in Western Europe and the Middle East.

  • Brief report. Bureaucracy vs. the citizen

    Summary: Congressman Peter H. Dominick (R-Colo.) delivers his radio address, a Brief report, on October 23, 1961. Rep. Dominick discusses the difficulty some of his constituents have had in dealing with the federal bureaucracy. He says that the challenge is finding the proper person or agency to solve problems and notes that the increasing size of the federal government will mean that the trend toward excessive red tape will only get worse.

  • Brief report. Committees

    Summary: Congressman Peter H. Dominick (R-Colo.) delivers his radio address, a Brief report, on October 2, 1961. Rep. Dominick lists the various types of Congressional committees including standing committees, select or special committees, joint committees and conference committees. He also briefly describes their functions, reviews the criteria used to assign members to different committees and talks about the steps that the committees take to produce reports that will be used by other members of Congress to make decisions about legislation.

  • Brief report. Exports to Communist countries

    Summary: Congressman Peter H. Dominick (R-Colo.) delivers his weekly radio address, a Brief report, on Sept. 14, 1961. Rep. Dominick discusses topics including the sale of strategic materials and agricultural commodities to Communist countries. He indicates that an investigation of export licenses approved by the State Dept. will be conducted, with a view to possible strengthening of existing export controls.

  • Brief report. Flood projects in Colo.

    Summary: Senator Peter H. Dominick (R-Colo.) delivers his weekly radio address, a Brief report, on Nov. 5, 1965. Sen. Dominick discusses topics including flood damage in Colorado, flood projects in Colorado, the Chatfield Dam study, the Two Forks and Narrows dams, and other flood control measures.

  • Brief report. Oil

    Summary: Congressman Peter H. Dominick (R-Colo.) delivers his radio address, a Brief report, on October 23, 1961. Rep. Dominick discusses the oil and gas industries in the United States and the Soviet Union, comparing how oil exploration and discovery in the U.S. may be restricted due to a new Dept. of Interior policy on awarding leases, while the Soviet Union is opening new oil fields and expanding into new markets. Dominick also discusses the danger that low Soviet oil prices pose to world markets and the Soviet's use of oil as a means to politically manipulate their trading partners.

  • Brief report. Questionnaire results

    Summary: Congressman Peter H. Dominick (R-Colo.) delivers his radio address, a Brief report, on November 13, 1961. Rep. Dominick gives the results of a questionnaire sent to members of the second Congressional district to assess their opinions on national and international issues. International issues covered include U.S. policy on communist aggression, U.S. membership in the United Nations, sales of surplus U.S. crops to communist countries, the fomenting of revolt in communist countries by the U.S., and the creation of a federal academy to train foreign service personnel. National issues covered by the public opinion poll include federal funding of private civil defense shelters, primary and secondary schools and medical care programs; program cuts to reduce the federal budget deficit and the application of anti-trust laws to labor unions.

  • Brief report. S.E. Asia

    Summary: Congressman Peter H. Dominick (R-Colo.) delivers his weekly radio address, a Brief report, on Nov. 10, 1961. Rep. Dominick discusses topics including the deteriorating American position in South Vietnam, Thailand and Laos, the belated declaration of war by the South Vietnamese government, delays in getting U.S.-supplied weapons and ammunition out of Saigon and into the field, and the apparent lack of will exhibited by the U.S. State Dept.

  • Brief report. The massive blackout

    Summary: Senator Peter H. Dominick (R-Colo.) delivers his radio address, a Brief report, on November 23, 1965. Sen. Dominick discusses the cause of the massive blackout of electrical service in the northeastern United States and Canada on November 9, 1965. Noting that a faulty switch in Canada led to a chain reaction of power failures in interdependent electrical systems, Dominick says that the event should serve as an analogy to the dangers of the centralization of government power. He discusses his view that each area of the United States should be self-reliant and not depend too heavily on other areas.

  • Brief report. United States-Soviet joint lunar landing

    Summary: Senator Peter H. Dominick (R-Colo.) delivers his radio address, a Brief report, in 1963. In the portion of the recording that can be heard, Sen. Dominick discusses President John F. Kennedy's proposal to cooperate with the Soviet Union in a joint lunar landing. He says the proposal raises many questions including whether this indicates a change in U.S. policy toward the Soviet Union, how the effort will affect NASA's space projects and budget, and whether the cooperative program will strengthen or weaken our national security.