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National Jewish Hospital (U.S.)

 Organization

Est. 1899, National Jewish Hospital for Consumptives changed its name several times, subsequently being known as National Jewish Hospital (1925) becoming National Jewish Hospital and Research Center (1965), National Jewish Hospital/National Asthma Center (after merging with the National Asthma Center in 1978), National Jewish Center for Immunology and Respiratory Medicine (1985), and then renamed as National Jewish Medical and Research Center (1997). Name changed to National Jewish Health (2008). See http://www.nationaljewish.org/about/

Found in 7 Collections and/or Records:

Blazing the Trail: An Early History of Denver’s Jewish Community, 2009

 Item
Identifier: B230.03.0023.00007
Overview Brief description of several early Jewish leaders of commerce, philanthropy, religion, and community as well as several Jewish lawyers, doctors, merchants, and politicians in Colorado.

Formal portrait of Rabbi William S. Friedman, circa 1935

 Item
Identifier: B063.06.0006.00065
Overview Head and shoulders portrait of Rabbi William S. Friedman wearing pince-nez glasses. Rabbi Friedman became the rabbi of Temple Emanuel in 1889 at the age of 21 and served until 1938. A graduate of Hebrew Union College and a leader in the movement of Reform Judaism, he specialized in classic oratory and maintained a high civic profile in Denver, Colorado. He was a founder of National Jewish Hospital and Community Chest, a nonsectarian charity organization.

Formal portrait of Rabbi William S. Friedman, circa 1935

 Item
Identifier: B063.06.0014.00046
Overview Head and shoulders portrait of Rabbi William S. Friedman wearing pince-nez glasses. Rabbi Friedman became the rabbi of Temple Emanuel in 1889 at the age of 21 and served until 1938. A graduate of Hebrew Union College and a leader in the movement of Reform Judaism, he specialized in classic oratory and maintained a high civic profile in Denver, Colorado. He was a founder of National Jewish Hospital and Community Chest, a nonsectarian charity organization.

Formal portrait of Rabbi William S. Friedman, circa 1930

 Item
Identifier: B063.06.0031.0001.00001
Overview Rabbi William S. Friedman is shown seated in a formal portrait. Rabbi Friedman became the rabbi of Temple Emanuel in 1889 at the age of 21 and served until 1938. A graduate of Hebrew Union College and a leader in the movement of Reform Judaism, he specialized in classic oratory and maintained a high civic profile in Denver, Colorado. He was a founder of National Jewish Hospital and Community Chest, a nonsectarian charity organization.

Formal portrait of Rabbi William S. Friedman, circa 1935

 Item
Identifier: B063.06.0033.0008.00001
Overview Head and shoulders portrait of Rabbi William S. Friedman wearing pince-nez glasses. Rabbi Friedman became the rabbi of Temple Emanuel in 1889 at the age of 21 and served until 1938. A graduate of Hebrew Union College and a leader in the movement of Reform Judaism, he specialized in classic oratory and maintained a high civic profile in Denver, Colorado. He was a founder of National Jewish Hospital and Community Chest, a nonsectarian charity organization.

Formal portrait of Rabbi William S. Friedman, circa 1935

 Item
Identifier: B063.06.0033.0008.00002
Overview Head and shoulders portrait of Rabbi William S. Friedman wearing pince-nez glasses. Rabbi Friedman became the rabbi of Temple Emanuel in 1889 at the age of 21 and served until 1938. A graduate of Hebrew Union College and a leader in the movement of Reform Judaism, he specialized in classic oratory and maintained a high civic profile in Denver, Colorado. He was a founder of National Jewish Hospital and Community Chest, a nonsectarian charity organization.

Group of Men at National Jewish Hospital, circa 1934

 Item
Identifier: B063.05.0041.00018
Overview Ten men stand in a row at National Jewish Hospital. Left to right are Earl Morris, Dr. Louis Adelman, Alfred Grauman, Dr. Charles Kaufman, Milton Guldman, Rabbi W.S. Friedman, Ed Johnson, Jacob Wolff, Walter Appel, and Sam Schaefer .