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Spivak, C. D. (Charles D.), 1861-1927

 Person

A Jewish Immigrant from Tsarist Russia, Spivak pursued medicine out of a desire to be of service to humanity. In 1896, when his wife Jennie showed signs of incipient tuberculosis, Spivak moved their young family to Denver to take advantage of Colorado’s reputation as the World’s Sanatorium. Spivak's concern for the indignant consumptives he saw flooding into the state led to his founding the Jewish Consumptives’ Relief Society (JCRS), a sanatorium dedicated to the care of all, even those in the advanced stages of TB. Spivak also ensured that the primarily Eastern European Jewish patients were cared for in an environment that respected their culture- unlike many such institutions, the JCRS featured a kosher kitchen and observed the Jewish Sabbath and holidays. Dr. Spivak was also an associate professor of medicine at the University of Denver from 1896-1901.

Citation

Leḳsiḳon fun der nayer Yidisher liṭeraṭur, 1965 (Spiṿaḳ, Ḥayim; d. 10-16-1927; b. as Ḥayim-Ḥayḳl Spiṿaḳoṿsḳi; d. in Denver, Colorado) Yehoash. Idish ṿerṭerbukh, 1926: t.p. (Dr. Ḥayim Spiṿaḳ) t.p. verso (Dr. C. D. Spivak [in rom.]) Who's who in American Jewry, 1926 (Spivak, Charles; physician, author; b. 12-25-1861, Krementschug, Russia).

Found in 49 Collections and/or Records:

Letter from C.D. Spivak to S. Schwartzberg, 1910 July 7

 Item
Identifier: B002.01.0102.0098.00028
Overview Typed letter from C.D. Spivak to S. Schwartzberg acknowledging he received the check for $19.45 from the King David Lodge. Spivak is happy to hear from Schwartzberg and appreciates the fact that Schwartzberg is thinking about JCRS and the work that they do. Spivak signs the letter "Secretary" at the bottom.

Letter from C.D. Spivak to S.F. Disraelly, 1911 August 12

 Item
Identifier: B002.01.0104.0026.00015
Overview Letter from C.D. Spivak to S.F. Disraelly. Spivak enclosed several checks and listed the amount for each patient. $29.25 for the funeral expenses of Michael Leckstein, $18.50 for funeral expenses of Samuel Ledgin. $6.02 for funeral expenses of Belle Shapiro. $5.41 for funeral expenses of Abraham Kovalsky. And $25.00 for the tomb stone to be set on the grave of Max Hamburger. Spivak asks Disraelly to acknowledge that he received all of the checks.

Letter from C.D. Spivak to S.F. Disraelly, 1912 July 15

 Item
Identifier: B002.01.0104.0151.00026
Overview Letter from C.D. Spivak to S.F. Disraelly. Spivak tells Disraelly that Henry Schnoor’s family has contributed $38.24 to erect a gravestone over Schnoor’s grave, but they are not able to fully pay the amount of the funeral expenses and the cost for the tombstone. Spivak asks Disraelly what JCRS can afford to do about the situation.

Letter from C.D. Spivak to S.F. Disraelly, 1912 September 10

 Item
Identifier: B002.01.0104.0151.00028
Overview Letter from C.D. Spivak to S.F. Disraelly. Spivak tells Disraelly that he wrote to him on July 15th, 1912 about the $38.24 that the Schnoor children gave to JCRS to help pay for funeral expenses, as well as erect a tombstone over their father’s grave. Spivak asks Disraelly to provide his opinion about the situation.

Letter from C.D. Spivak to S.F. Disraelly, 1910 December 13

 Item
Identifier: B002.01.0102.0142.00022
Overview Typed letter from C.D. Spivak to S.F. Disraelly. Spivak enclosed a check for $33.50 to cover the cost of Anna Hornstein’s funeral expenses. Spivak asked Disraelly to acknowledge that he received the money.

Letter from E. Gonda to C.D. Spivak, 1910 June 19

 Item
Identifier: B002.01.0102.0106.00015
Overview Handwritten letter from the Gonda family to C.D. Spivak. The letter expresses how surprised the family is from the news of their father passing away. Based on a previous letter from Spivak, they thought Louis Gonda would recover because Spivak gave them reassurance that he was doing okay. They also request that Spivak sends any belongings left behind from Louis such as a watch, gold chain, pin, clothing, and letters. They also request to know the location of his grave, as well as obtain the...

Letter from E. Gonda to C.D. Spivak, 1910 August 3

 Item
Identifier: B002.01.0102.0106.00024
Overview Handwritten letter from Mrs. Ethel Gonda to C.D. Spivak. She begins the letter by stating that the family is in very poor circumstances and would like Spivak to do what he can with the photographic equipment. She then mentions that the family plans on moving back to Europe once they can save enough money. She again requests that the death certificate be sent soon because it is an important document that they need for the move. She signs the letter "Mrs. Gonda" with their address and in large,...

Letter from I. Rapaport to JCRS, 1911 November 22

 Item
Identifier: B002.01.0104.0155.00019
Overview Handwritten letter from I. Rapaport to JCRS. Mrs. Rapaport tells JCRS that she responded to their telegram and sent an answer back. Ida tells JCRS that she is not a rich woman, but the National Jewish Hospital owes her son $25.00 which Ida tells JCRS they can use to pay for her son’s burial. She also sent a money order of $7.00 to cover the remaining balance of the burial for a total of $32.00. She hopes there will be no trouble in collecting the $25.00 from the National Jewish Hospital.

Letter from J. Fishman to C.D. Spivak, 1910 April 21

 Item
Identifier: B002.01.0102.0098.00022
Overview Handwritten letter from Jacob Fishman, a member of the King David Lodge, to C.D. Spivak asking if he can retrieve a burial certificate for the death of David Rubin. He says that he enclosed one dollar to pay for the certificate.

Letter from J. Schkolnick to C.D Spivak, 1911 December 21

 Item
Identifier: B002.01.0104.0165.00013
Overview Letter from J. Schkolnick to C.D. Spivak. Schkolnick explains that he is not able to spare any cash for his brother’s burial, but his brother did belong to the Workmen’s Circle Branch 80 and they would be able to pay for Adolph Schkolnick’s burial. Schkolnick explains to Spivak that he must receive a copy of his brother’s death certificate to show the Workmen’s Circle so that they would be willing to pay for the burial. Schkolnick also requested that Spivak send him any papers left behind from...