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Henry Winn Pinkham Papers

 Collection
Identifier: M044

Henry Winn Pinkham (1864-1947) was a minister and anti-war activitist born in Newton Centre, Massachusetts and educated at Brown University and Newton Theological School. He lived in Denver, Colorado from 1896-1912. Pinkham was ordained a Baptist minister but joined the American Unitarian Association in 1912. His outspoken opposition to U.S. involvement in World War I led him to join the Fellowship of Reconciliation. He also served as secretary of the Association to Abolish War from 1920-1927. The Association was a pacifist group committed to standing firm against the "preparedness" movement of the times. The papers include the writings and correspondence of Henry Winn Pinkham that relate to his anti-war activities along with biographical materials on Pinkham and his wife, Wenona Osborne Pinkham.

Dates

  • 1909-1947

Creator

Extent

1 Linear Feet (2 legal document boxes)

Scope and Contents

The collection consists mainly of Pinkham's writings, both letters to the editor and articles, in typescript form. The majority of the letters to the editor date from the World War I era, although there are also some that date to 1915, during his first active involvement in the peace movement. His personal correspondence from 1917 to 1946, including correspondence between Pinkham and the American Unitarian Association regarding his inability to obtain a pastorate, is also included.

Biographical / Historical

Henry Winn Pinkham was a minister and anti-war activist. Born in Newton Centre, Massachusetts, in 1864, he was educated at Brown University and Newton Theological School. He was ordained as a Baptist minister in 1891, and served a church in Bridgeport, Connecticut, before moving to Denver in 1896. Pinkham was very outspoken about social justice issues, and because of this he and his church were excluded from the Rocky Mountain Association of Baptist Churches. In 1909, Pinkham, along with the congregation, joined the American Unitarian Association. In 1912, Pinkham moved back to Massachusetts with his wife, Wenona Osborne Pinkham. In 1915, Pinkham was appointed minister of the Melrose (Mass.) Unitarian Church. However, his outspoken opposition to American involvement in World War I forced him to resign his post in 1917. He was unable to obtain another pastorate, and so devoted himself to the anti-war movement. He was involved in the Fellowship of Reconciliation, and was secretary of the Association to Abolish War from 1920 to 1927. After 1927 he concentrated his energies on writing letters to the editor and articles, which were published in religious journals such as Unity, The Christian Leader, and The Christian Register, and in many major newspapers. Pinkham's vehemence and single-mindedness in his opposition to war also gained him rejections from such magazines as the Atlantic Monthly, and the displeasure of many in the leadership of the Unitarian Church. Reverend Pinkham died in January 1947.

Arrangement

The papers are arranged in two series:; 1. Biographical Materials and Letters to the Editor, 1909-1947.; 2. Manuscripts and Articles, 1911-1923.;

Immediate Source of Acquisition

Gift of Dorothy D. Busiek, 1972.

Accruals

No further accruals are expected.

General

A calendar of the collection, describing each letter and article individually, is available in the Collection Guides of the Special Collections and Archives Department in the University Libraries. The calendar also contains a biographical sketch and a section written about the significance of the collection.

Repository Details

Part of the Special Collections and Archives Repository

Contact:
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