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Reform Judaism

 Subject
Subject Source: Local sources

Found in 13 Collections and/or Records:

Billings, Montana, 1977-1978

 File
Identifier: B114.04.0001.0005
Overview A few Jewish merchants settled in Billings in 1884, but a community began only after 1900. Congregation Beth Aaron was formed in Billings in 1918. The Jewish population grew and declined mainly with the boom (1950s) and bust (1960's) of the oil business. By 1979, there were approx. 30-40 Jewish families in Billings.

Box 1, 1884-1887

 File — Box B135.01.0001: Series B135.01 [U186020745971]
Identifier: B135.01.0001
Overview On July 13, 1884, Horrace Tabor conveyed property, as a gift, to "David May for the Benefit of the Congregation Israel." The congregation was organized primarily by Germanic Jews under the practice of Reform Judaism. The temple cost $4,000 to erect and was dedicated on September 19, 1884. A separate Jewish cemetery was also created. Of Leadville's population of 30,000 in the early 1800s, there were around around 300 Jewish residents. Many Jewish families in Leadville left after the silver panic...

Box 86, 1987-2011

 File — Box B258.01.0086: Series B258.01; Series B258.02 [U186023261772]
Identifier: B258.01.0086
Overview Contains 6 folders of Minutes (1987-2011), 2 membership reports (1996-2011), and 2 membership lists (1987-1996), 2 staff retreats (1992-2000), 2 Board retreats (1992-2006) and correspondence (1991 and 2000).

Formal portrait of Rabbi William S. Friedman, circa 1930

 Item
Identifier: B063.06.0031.0001.00001
Overview Rabbi William S. Friedman is shown seated in a formal portrait. Rabbi Friedman became the rabbi of Temple Emanuel in 1889 at the age of 21 and served until 1938. A graduate of Hebrew Union College and a leader in the movement of Reform Judaism, he specialized in classic oratory and maintained a high civic profile in Denver, Colorado. He was a founder of National Jewish Hospital and Community Chest, a nonsectarian charity organization.

Formal portrait of Rabbi William S. Friedman, circa 1935

 Item
Identifier: B063.06.0033.0008.00001
Overview Head and shoulders portrait of Rabbi William S. Friedman wearing pince-nez glasses. Rabbi Friedman became the rabbi of Temple Emanuel in 1889 at the age of 21 and served until 1938. A graduate of Hebrew Union College and a leader in the movement of Reform Judaism, he specialized in classic oratory and maintained a high civic profile in Denver, Colorado. He was a founder of National Jewish Hospital and Community Chest, a nonsectarian charity organization.

Formal portrait of Rabbi William S. Friedman, circa 1935

 Item
Identifier: B063.06.0033.0008.00002
Overview Head and shoulders portrait of Rabbi William S. Friedman wearing pince-nez glasses. Rabbi Friedman became the rabbi of Temple Emanuel in 1889 at the age of 21 and served until 1938. A graduate of Hebrew Union College and a leader in the movement of Reform Judaism, he specialized in classic oratory and maintained a high civic profile in Denver, Colorado. He was a founder of National Jewish Hospital and Community Chest, a nonsectarian charity organization.

Formal portrait of Rabbi William S. Friedman, circa 1935

 Item
Identifier: B063.06.0014.00046
Overview Head and shoulders portrait of Rabbi William S. Friedman wearing pince-nez glasses. Rabbi Friedman became the rabbi of Temple Emanuel in 1889 at the age of 21 and served until 1938. A graduate of Hebrew Union College and a leader in the movement of Reform Judaism, he specialized in classic oratory and maintained a high civic profile in Denver, Colorado. He was a founder of National Jewish Hospital and Community Chest, a nonsectarian charity organization.

Formal portrait of Rabbi William S. Friedman, circa 1935

 Item
Identifier: B063.06.0006.00065
Overview Head and shoulders portrait of Rabbi William S. Friedman wearing pince-nez glasses. Rabbi Friedman became the rabbi of Temple Emanuel in 1889 at the age of 21 and served until 1938. A graduate of Hebrew Union College and a leader in the movement of Reform Judaism, he specialized in classic oratory and maintained a high civic profile in Denver, Colorado. He was a founder of National Jewish Hospital and Community Chest, a nonsectarian charity organization.