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Tuberculosis -- Hospitals -- Denver (Colo.)

 Subject
Subject Source: Local sources

Found in 27 Collections and/or Records:

Check from C.D. Spivak with amount left from F. Schneiderman, 1912 July 15

 Item
Identifier: B002.01.0102.0139.00025
Overview Check from C.D. Spivak and processed by S.F. Disraelly for the amount of $1.50 left from F. Schneiderman's personal belongings after his death.

Copy of bill for F. Schneiderman's burial, 1910 September 9

 Item
Identifier: B002.01.0102.0139.00021
Overview Copy of receipt from Golden Hill Cemetery detailing the cost of Frank Schneiderman's burial. Items charged on the bill include a hearse, grave, digging, undertaker, Bal Misaskim, and Tachrichem. The total of the bill comes to $31.50. The block and grave numbers are listed on the receipt as well.

Envelope from Geo. Bettcher to Mr. Sneider , 1966 May 5

 Item
Identifier: B002.01.0102.0139.00027
Overview Front side of an envelope addressed to Mr. Sneider in Denver, Colorado. The verso of the envelope lists Frank Sneiderman with the date of his death and a note to call a man named Harry with his home and business number.

Frank Schneiderman's Application for Admission to JCRS, 1907 October 29

 Item
Identifier: B002.01.0102.0139.00001
Overview Application form of Frank Schneiderman for admission as a patient to the Jewish Consumptives' Relief Society. He was age 31 at the time of the application. He was born in Russia and immigrated to the United States in 1892. He lived in Philadelphia when he contracted tuberculosis. He had been sick for 3 months upon arrival to Denver, Colorado. He was married and had 3 children. He also worked as a tailor. The verso of the application states he was admitted on November 5, 1907 and left on May 11,...

Frank Schneiderman's Application for Admission to JCRS, 1910 May 9

 Item
Identifier: B002.01.0102.0139.00014
Overview Application form of Frank Schneiderman for admission as a patient to the Jewish Consumptives' Relief Society. He was age 38 at the time of the application. He was born in Russia and immigrated to the United States in 1880. He lived in Philadelphia when he contracted tuberculosis. He had been sick for ten years upon arrival to Denver, Colorado. He was married and had 4 children. He also worked as a tailor. He states that he attended JCRS as a patient before this application. The verso of the...

Letter from B. Schneiderman to C.D. Spivak, 1910 October 21

 Item
Identifier: B002.01.0102.0139.00023
Overview Handwritten letter from B. Schneiderman to C.D. Spivak. Schneiderman informs Spivak that she cannot pay Spivak for the burial of her late husband. She also says that she does not have enough money to pay for her children. She accuses Spivak for not putting her husband in a coffin before putting him in the ground and reminds him that she does not have anything to pay. The letter is signed, “Beckie Schneiderman” at the bottom.

Letter from C.D. Spivak to B. Schneiderman, 1907 November 4

 Item
Identifier: B002.01.0102.0139.00008
Overview Typed letter from C.D. Spivak to B. Schneiderman informing her that her husband, Frank Schneiderman was invited for admission to the Jewish Consumptives' Relief Society. Spivak trusts that Schneiderman's stay at JCRS will be beneficial for his health. He signs the letter "Secretary" at the bottom.

Letter from C.D. Spivak to B. Schneiderman, 1910 September 6

 Item
Identifier: B002.01.0102.0139.00020
Overview Typed letter from C.D. Spivak to B. Schneiderman informing her that her husband, Frank Schneiderman peacefully passed away at the sanatorium. Spivak tells Schneiderman that the body was taken to Whitehead and Myers Undertaking Establishment on 519 18th Street.

Letter from C.D. Spivak to B. Schneiderman, 1910 September 16

 Item
Identifier: B002.01.0102.0139.00022
Overview Typed letter from C.D. Spivak to B. Schneiderman. Spivak enclosed a bill for the funeral expenses of Frank Schneiderman. The total of the bill comes to $31.50. Spivak tells Schneiderman that they have $1.50 in their possession from the effects left behind from Frank. Spivak hopes that he will receive B. Schneiderman’s immediate attention to the matter and signs the letter at the bottom.