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Reform Judaism

 Subject
Subject Source: Local sources

Found in 20 Collections and/or Records:

Formal portrait of Rabbi William S. Friedman, circa 1930

 Item
Identifier: B063.06.0031.0001.00001
Overview Rabbi William S. Friedman is shown seated in a formal portrait. Rabbi Friedman became the rabbi of Temple Emanuel in 1889 at the age of 21 and served until 1938. A graduate of Hebrew Union College and a leader in the movement of Reform Judaism, he specialized in classic oratory and maintained a high civic profile in Denver, Colorado. He was a founder of National Jewish Hospital and Community Chest, a nonsectarian charity organization.

Formal portrait of Rabbi William S. Friedman, circa 1935

 Item
Identifier: B063.06.0033.0008.00001
Overview Head and shoulders portrait of Rabbi William S. Friedman wearing pince-nez glasses. Rabbi Friedman became the rabbi of Temple Emanuel in 1889 at the age of 21 and served until 1938. A graduate of Hebrew Union College and a leader in the movement of Reform Judaism, he specialized in classic oratory and maintained a high civic profile in Denver, Colorado. He was a founder of National Jewish Hospital and Community Chest, a nonsectarian charity organization.

Formal portrait of Rabbi William S. Friedman, circa 1935

 Item
Identifier: B063.06.0033.0008.00002
Overview Head and shoulders portrait of Rabbi William S. Friedman wearing pince-nez glasses. Rabbi Friedman became the rabbi of Temple Emanuel in 1889 at the age of 21 and served until 1938. A graduate of Hebrew Union College and a leader in the movement of Reform Judaism, he specialized in classic oratory and maintained a high civic profile in Denver, Colorado. He was a founder of National Jewish Hospital and Community Chest, a nonsectarian charity organization.

Grossman Family Papers

 Collection
Identifier: B155
Overview The Grossman family emigrated to America from the Austro-Hungarian Empire and moved to Denver because of tuberculosis. Abraham Grossman was an active member of the traditional Beth Ha Medrosh Hagodol (BMH) Synagogue and later of the Oheb Zedek Congregation which broke away from BMH in 1911. The Oheb Zedek Congregation rejoined the parent synagogue toward the end of the Great Depression. Abraham Grossman was the proprietor of the Grossman's Haberdashery, located on Sixteenth Street in Denver,...

Pearl Street Temple Emanuel Synagogue Foundation Records

 Collection
Identifier: B276
Overview Founded in 1874, Temple Emanuel, also known as Congregation Emanuel, is the largest and oldest synagogue in the Rocky Mountain Region. The location at 16th and Pearl streets was dedicated in January of 1899 and served the congregation until they fully expanded into their current location on Grape Street in 1960. In 2006 the Pearl Street Temple was purchased by Denver Community Church. The building is a National Historic Site. Collection contains photographs, scrapbooks, administrative papers,...

Portrait of Rabbi William S. Friedman, 1899 November

 Item
Identifier: B063.06.0006.00010
Overview Head and shoulders portrait of Rabbi Friedman wearing pince-nez glasses. Friedman was a leader of Temple Emanuel located on corner of 16th Avenue and Pearl Street in Denver, Colorado.

Portrait of Rabbi William S. Friedman, 1899 November

 Item
Identifier: B063.06.0006.00011
Overview Head and shoulders portrait of Rabbi Friedman wearing pince-nez glasses. Friedman was a leader of Temple Emanuel located on corner of 16th Avenue and Pearl Street in Denver, Colorado.

Rabbi Samuel Adelman, 1957-1968

 File
Identifier: B111.01.0001.0001
Overview Rabbi Samuel Adelman (1916-1966) was the leader of Beth Ha Medrosh Hagodol (BMH) Synagogue from 1957 until his death in 1966. He was also the president of the Religious Council on Human Relations for Metropolitan Denver and the Denver Housing Board, and was well-known for his talks on Russian Jews. Adelman was buried at Mount Nebo Cemetary and an estimated 1,400 people attended memorial services at BMH.

Temple Aaron (Trinidad, Colo.) Records

 Collection
Identifier: B133
Overview On July 23, 1883, twenty-nine Jews of Trinidad, Colorado met in the home of Sol Jaffe to organize a synagogue. They adopted the name of Congregation Aaron in honor of the Jaffe brothers’ (Sol, Henry, and Samuel) father. Samuel Jaffe, who became Trinidad’s first mayor, was chosen vice-president. In 1889, Rabbi Leopold Freudenthal, became the congregation’s second rabbi and served until his death in 1916. He gradually introduced moderate Reform Judaism. In addition to Jews from Trinidad, many...