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Ration books

 Subject
Subject Source: Library of Congress Subject Headings

Found in 5 Collections and/or Records:

Company Records, 1945, 2012

 Series
Identifier: B370.02
Scope and Contents Contains folder with brochure for the Siegel Energy Corporation and a framed ration stamp form and gasoline purchase permit.
Dates: 1945, 2012

Gasoline Purchase Permit and Ration Stamps, 1945

 Item
Identifier: B370.02.0002.00001
Overview Ration stamps were used during World War II in the United States for many items, including gasoline. The object is a framed and mounted Gasoline Purchase Permit and Ration Stamp or Coupon Sheet. The Ration Stamp or Coupon Sheet has ration stamps on it and was sent to the Midway Gas and Oil Co. Ben Siegel worked for Midway Gas and Oil Company at the time. The Gasoline Purchase Permit was good for eight gallons of gasoline and was issued to M. Lortunatt.
Dates: 1945

Max Lowenstein's Ration Card, 1945-1946

 Item
Identifier: B333.05.0001.0005.00007
Overview Ration card issued to Max Lowenstien, ID number 6389 in district M by the "Jüdische Gemeinde zu Berlin" or the "Jewish Community in Berlin." The bottom of the card is signed "Maria Lowenstein." Ten columns across back titled Kartoffeln (potato), Gemüse (vegetables) and then labeld A-H. There are several date stamps across the columns.
Dates: 1945-1946

Ration Book, between 1940-1945

 Item
Identifier: B173.01.0007.00004
Overview A World War II brown leather ration book wallet with ''RATION BOOK'' embossed on front in gold colored print. The larger section and the change section each have a tan metal button. The ration book was used to hold ration stamps for items that were scarce during World War II, such as gasoline, sugar, meat, clothing and coffee. Originally belonged to Robert Lazar Miller.
Dates: between 1940-1945

Toltz Family WWI Ration Books

 Collection
Identifier: B262
Overview The Office of Price Administration warned Americans of potential gasoline, steel, aluminum, and electricity shortages in the summer of 1941. It believed that with factories converting to military production and consuming many critical supplies, rationing would become necessary if the country entered the war. It established a rationing system after the attack on Pearl Harbor. George (Gedalia) Toltz, Minnie (Munya) Toltz had three children, Ida Toltz Radetsky, Israel Toltz, and Rose Toltz Mizel....
Dates: 1943